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Statement of Associated Fisheries of Maine on the Retirement of US Senator Olympia Snowe
Today Maine’s coastal communities and fishing industries are reeling from the sudden and unexpected announcement by US Senator Olympia Snowe that she intends to retire after 33 years of public service.

Maggie Raymond, Executive Director of Associated Fisheries of Maine, expressed sadness and regret on learning that Senator Snowe will not seek re-election for the Senate post she has held for three consecutive terms. “We are losing an advocate who is incredibly attuned to the historical, cultural and economic dependence of Maine’s coastal communities and fishing families on the vitality of marine resources. For two decades, we’ve trusted Senator Snowe to protect our fishing heritage through her leadership on the subcommittee on Oceans, Atmosphere, Fisheries, and the Coast Guard, and she has certainly delivered time and again on that trust.”
 

Terry Alexander, President of Associated Fisheries of Maine responded to the news of Senator Snowe’s retirement by saying, “She is leaving some pretty big shoes to fill. We are certainly going to miss her leadership and advocacy for fishing businesses and fishing communities.”

All members of Associated Fisheries of Maine wish Senator Snowe the very best in her retirement.

Associated Fisheries of Maine is a trade association of fishing and fishing dependent businesses. Membership includes harvesters, processors, fuel, gear and ice dealers, marine insurers and lenders, as well as other public and private individuals with an interest in commercial fishing.

Contact information:

Maggie Raymond, Executive Director
Associated Fisheries of Maine
207-384-4854

 

 

 

 

 

 

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