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Gulf seafood deformities alarm scientists
April 18, 2012 - Eyeless shrimp and fish with lesions are becoming common, with BP oil pollution believed to be the likely cause.
 

New Orleans, LA - April 18, 2012 -- "The fishermen have never seen anything like this," Dr Jim Cowan told Al Jazeera. "And in my 20 years working on red snapper, looking at somewhere between 20 and 30,000 fish, I've never seen anything like this either."

Dr Cowan, with Louisiana State University's Department of Oceanography and Coastal Sciences started hearing about fish with sores and lesions from fishermen in November 2010.

Cowan's findings replicate those of others living along vast areas of the Gulf Coast that have been impacted by BP's oil and dispersants.

Gulf of Mexico fishermen, scientists and seafood processors have told Al Jazeera they are finding disturbing numbers of mutated shrimp, crab and fish that they believe are deformed by chemicals released during BP's 2010 oil disaster.

Along with collapsing fisheries, signs of malignant impact on the regional ecosystem are ominous: horribly mutated shrimp, fish with oozing sores, underdeveloped blue crabs lacking claws, eyeless crabs and shrimp - and interviewees' fingers point towards BP's oil pollution disaster as being the cause.

Read the full story at Al Jazeera.

 

 

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GLOUCESTER DAILY TIMES: Core fishing problem still not addressed

November 24, 2014 -- It was certainly good to see the New England Fisheries Management Council vote last week to reject a NOAA move to uniformly and concurrently institute spawning closures in four prime fishing areas that surround Gloucester — and to instead look toward seasonal closures that should at least give Gloucester’s endangered groundfishing fleet some alternatives to stay afloat.